Intricate Mongolian Media Art

Between world leading countries Russia and China lies Mongolia, a country with a long history of visual art, starting with cave paintings sometimes dating back 8000 years. Throughout the centuries painting has remained strongly represented in Mongolia’s art tradition, frequent subjects were the Mongolian landscape, animals and the nomadic lifestyle. For a long time there was also a focus on decorative arts and crafts, inspired by Tibetan and Chinese examples. During the Mongolian Empire (13th and 14th century) not a lot of fine art was made, yet it was highly appreciated and the leaders of the dynasty became important patrons of the arts and promoted the spread of art. Continue reading “Intricate Mongolian Media Art”

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Art Careers – Hendrik Driessen (Part 2)

portret H Driessen 01This is part two of an article on Hendrik Driessen, director of De Pont, a museum for contemporary visual art in Tilburg, the Netherlands. The first part is about how he became director of De Pont and about his responsibilities. This article describes his daily activities, his vision on the museum and the buying of new works. Continue reading “Art Careers – Hendrik Driessen (Part 2)”

The future of labor

What does the future look like? There have been many storytelling examples of future scenarios in which many processes have been automated. In these visions robots will replace people in their jobs, but where does that leave humans? And while these ideas about our future seem far away they are actually quite close. Think about the self-driving cars which are being tested and improved as we speak, which will make chauffeurs obsolete. What do these developments mean for making money in order to cover your living expenses in our capitalist society? This is the concept of artist Manuel Beltrán’s current project named Institute of Human Obsolescence.

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Natural technology

In a relatively short time span technology is being developed at a rapid pace. Where scenarios of robots behaving like humans once seemed a nearly impossible idea, now that far away future is actually quite close. The relationships between nature and technology is getting more and more integrated as the last is used to reproduce or replace natural elements. This intersection is the essence of artist Christiaan Zwanikken (1967). Recently he had an exhibition at the Electriciteitsfabriek or the Zwanikken Fabriek, for the occasion.

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Mirrors and water

A visit to the Chateau Versailles, France, is a spectacle in itself; the grand building lavished with gold and other decorations, the decadent interior, and not to forget the immense gardens surrounding it. It was commissioned by Louis XIV (1638-1715) to replace the hunting lodge his father had built at Versailles. Also known as the Sun King Louis XIV established his monarchy firmly and had the longest reign in European history (1643-1715). His palace had to fit his position and express his autonomy.

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Colorful reflection

Big shoes, collar, overdone painted smile, red round nose and an overall colorful outfit, who does not recognize the figure of the clown? He is a well-known character in popular culture and therefore presented artists with a relatable subject. Artists like Pablo Picasso, Auguste Renoir, Georges Seurat and Charley Toorop have concerned themselves with this red-nosed individual in their paintings. Today the colorful appearance of the clown decorates the exhibition space of the Boijmans van Beuningen in Ugo Rondinone’s Vocabulary of Solitude.

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