The future of labor

The future of labor

What does the future look like? There have been many storytelling examples of future scenarios in which many processes have been automated. In these visions robots will replace people in their jobs, but where does that leave humans? And while these ideas about our future seem far away they are actually quite close. Think about the self-driving cars which are being tested and improved as we speak, which will make chauffeurs obsolete. What do these developments mean for making money in order to cover your living expenses in our capitalist society? This is the concept of artist Manuel Beltrán’s current project named Institute of Human Obsolescence.

Continue reading “The future of labor”

Advertisements

Natural technology

Natural technology

In a relatively short time span technology is being developed at a rapid pace. Where scenarios of robots behaving like humans once seemed a nearly impossible idea, now that far away future is actually quite close. The relationships between nature and technology is getting more and more integrated as the last is used to reproduce or replace natural elements. This intersection is the essence of artist Christiaan Zwanikken (1967). Recently he had an exhibition at the Electriciteitsfabriek or the Zwanikken Fabriek, for the occasion.

Continue reading “Natural technology”

Tangible memories

Tangible memories

Most people take photographs to capture the memorable moments in their life. They want to be able to look at these images and reminisce about the events of the past, share them with others and tell the stories. Photography is regarded as a suitable medium for this because it relies on reality to be able to capture an image. So even though photographs can be manipulated, most people still consider them to be showing truths, what is seen in the picture must have happened at some point in time. It is this aspect of photography which surfaces in the exhibition Ask the Dusk by photographer Lara Gasparotto at the Fotomuseum Den Haag.

Continue reading “Tangible memories”

Peanut butter and floating rocks

Peanut butter and floating rocks

Every person has expectations when deciding to visit an exhibition, depending on how much you already know of the art on show beforehand. Still some artists manage to take you by surprise in doing something that raises different thoughts or feelings then you imagined. Dutchman Wim T. Schippers (1942) is such an artist, he has made installations that will leave you wondering for why and how etc.

Continue reading “Peanut butter and floating rocks”

Mirrors and water

Mirrors and water

A visit to the Chateau Versailles, France, is a spectacle in itself; the grand building lavished with gold and other decorations, the decadent interior, and not to forget the immense gardens surrounding it. It was commissioned by Louis XIV (1638-1715) to replace the hunting lodge his father had built at Versailles. Also known as the Sun King Louis XIV established his monarchy firmly and had the longest reign in European history (1643-1715). His palace had to fit his position and express his autonomy.

Continue reading “Mirrors and water”

Optical movement

Optical movement

Imagine standing in front of a geometric black and white painting with a repeating pattern, a zigzag for example, and wondering why it attracted your attention. At first you do not understand, but as your eyes examine the paintings surface you will start to see movement in there. You do not believe your eyes since it is only paint on a canvas, or is it a trick? No, this is what meeting an early Bridget Riley painting is like. The Gemeentemuseum in The Hague currently houses an exhibition where you can experience this for yourself.

Continue reading “Optical movement”